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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)
headlines from around the world. political turmoil in italy sending european stocks lower. italian banks leading the way down as mario monte keeps investors guessing in whether he'll run against sylvia berlusconi next year. the unexpected drop signals continued pressure from abroad. and meeting face-to-face, president obama and house speaker john boehner sit down for a one-on-one over the weekend. there are just three weeks left before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> italian shares are down nearly 3% this morning. for the most part, it is bank stocks leading the way down. we're now down about 2.76% on the ftse mib. bank stocks have been hit particularly hard this morning. earlier, we saw shares down 5.6%. we're seeing the same thing, whether it's bmps hitting session lows down nearly 6% comes amid concerns about leadership and economic reform in italy following mario monte's announcement that he'll resign once the budget has been passed. this move is likely to bring the country forward to elections next year. the italian prime minister has offered no clue as to whether or not he
moment in italy. berlusconi has announced he's creating a new center right grouping. meanwhile, mario monti has been accused oversimplifying solutions during the fiscal crisis. carolin is joining us now from rome. do we expect more of this rhetoric today? >> oh, definitely. not just today, but specifically over two months. elections will only be held probably on february 24th. we've got about two months of the silly campaigning season to follow. so yes, as you said, the verbal exchange is definitely heating up. it started with mr. monti's response criticism coming from officials about his renewed request for the prime minister post yesterday. he said this criticism was out of place. it was offensive not just for him, but also for all of the people in italy who have the freedom to vote. this morning, he did an interview with one of the channels here in italy and he said, i don't really care about this spread because the spread is based on fraud. that's the direct translation. meanwhile, if you take a look at the spread, they are moving higher again. 4.9%. italian equity markets are mov
. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell says there's still time for an agreement. >> republicans aren't likely to sign a blank check just because we fin
a look at the bond curve. spain, this will be a good proxy for now. we'll get the ten year for italy in just a second. 35.34% is the level there. u.s. benefiting from fund flows well. choppy trade across the picture here. let's look at the italian curve before we get the results later today. we are seeing green across the board, so yields dipping before that probably has more to do with the political rhetoric we're seeing especially coming from berlusconi. under 4.6% for the ten-year and on the short and two, a bit of a rally. finally, let's close taking a look at the forex. euro/dollar is weaker. and it's holding just above 1.30. and the dollar/yen, this is the one sixuan mentioned to watch. heading into japanese elections, stocks outperform adding oots .1% to 83.35 this morning. >>> south korea's central bank may be worried about factors in the economy, but the dok says the economy is stronger than it used to be. more on that next. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp o
the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes. we're not just talking about heavy machinery but how you deal with specific stress with your age, gender, a doctor, the overwhelming majority of italian workers work with 10 or fewer employees. john: number 16 employee you have to have you representatives that is entitled to paid leave? >> eight hours per month. >> if you hire one more he must be disabled? >> number 16 the next one must be disabled or you pay the fine. john: 51st, 7% of payroll must be handicapped. >> 7% must qualify as disabled. rates of disability are pretty high. john: 101 employees, more rules. spain has reformed the stupid work rules that they no longer have to pay 42 months severance pay now it is just 24 months. that is still two years. >> if they turn out badly you will turn up and know them they show them two years. >> having 350,000 under seve
about this, kind of what like goes on in italy and show you how much we are to european style. >> neil: and don't drag our people down. >> i'm telling you, neil, people who stay with their parents. a term for italy who does this and they do this. >> neil: you're out of money. >> unemployed, underemployed and get paid your welfare payments and party every night and it's kind of where we're going and i think this is a direct correlation, and i think-- >> and you could have cited any other country on earth, but you had to go-- >> you know what. >> and you could have gone after france, but no, no, mother italy. charles, charles. >> firsthand experience. >> a lot of it points to a serious insecurity and you know, kids gone directly from college with the parents and sometimes may even have a job, but everyone is so intimidated by the economy or such a lack and i don't care what the polls say, people are worried about this, we have mcmahons reconfigured and i was going to sell my home, me and my wife and become a snow bird and that's not happening. it's worrisome. i know a guy who is actually
. for example, on industrial orders and sales in italy, orders flat on the month, down .2 on the month for sales and down nearly 5% on the year. so confirming some of the weakness that we know we've seen previously in the italian economy. meanwhile, another gauge perhaps for the euro as we look to the strength of it lately. that's the current counselor plus which in october was an adjusted 3.9 billion euros, up quite a bit from the 2.5 billion reported for september. now that also comes after -- a day after the european union's report suggesting that in fact the european union would have to run a surplus, given its poor demographics over the next couple of years. now let's get a quick preview of the news. for that we head to patricia, awaiting the results. what do we expect to see? >> reporter: we're expecting the second consecutive month to the upside for the business sentiment next year in germany. november was a surprise after six months to the downside. we expect december to book in a little increase again, but important is here, not only the expectation part of the index but also that we ge
worked in italy-- nicholas poussin and claude lorraine. turner followed claude's example by ennobling landscapes with historical or mythological figures. he made frequent visits to wales. as he moved further into the mountains, he found subjects that were central to one of the most powerful elements in late 18th century british aesthetic thought-- the sublime. ♪ the idea of the sublime, embodied by the overpowering majesty of nature's grandeur, was an idea popularized by the philosopher edmund burke. for burke, contemplating that grandeur-- either directly or in paintings-- overwhelmed viewers with feelings of fear, awe and exaltation. it also had a moral element, emphasizing man's insignificance and humility in the face of the terrifying forces of nature. the fascination with the sublime was an international phenomenon that intrigued many artists of the time-- inspiring philippe jacques de loutherbourg's terrifying alpine avalanche... joseph wright's spectacular vesuvius... and caspar david friedrich's transcendent image of a wanderer contemplating the infinite. turner's interest i
through the first ter. there will be a rocky road possibly driven by news from italy in the latter part of february. so i'd be long now, but i would -- on that position. >> and we'll get into more of on that in just a minute. allen will stay with us. if you have any questions, send them in. worldwide@cnbc.com. if you want to share your thoughts, say hello here on this quiet christmas week. we would appreciate that, too. >>> a ja toyota has agreed to settle a class action lawsuit. customers brought the case against toyota claiming certain models accelerated unintentionally. 16 million vehicles will be covered by this action. it includes the camry and corolla. the nikkei generally speaking was higher this morning. >>> the season of good will seems to have tech firms bye. this amid claims that ericsson breached a number of samsung patents. >>> now let's check in on markets. it's time to look at the heat map. and we have green, more green than red on the board today. by three to two, gainers outpacing losers. now, europe was closed yesterday. there was trading in the u.s. it was a weaker se
pipeline is meant to carry russian gas through bulgaria to austria and italy, but the u.s. and russia are arguing over the rules to be applied to the new pipeline. >> it is true that some difference remained regarding some aspects of energy relations between europe and russia. >> european demands for russia to separate gas companies and distribution channels have so far had no effect. and the russian leader was not prepared to take the criticism lying down. >> my good friend explained his position at such great length and with such a motion because he has a feeling he is in the wrong. >> the ongoing disputes about energy and trade are taking their toll on the you-russian relations. >> italy's prime minister has resigned. this move paves the way for elections to be held as early as february. mario monti has promised to hand in his resignation -- or had promised to hand in his resignation as soon as parliament passed a 2013 budget, which he led his -- kept his promise. he led a government of technocrats for the past year. europeans had held his economic reforms, but voters have been les
. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes. we're not just talking about heavy machinery but how you deal with specific stress with your age, gender, a doctor, the overwhelming majority of italian workers work with 10 or fewer employees. john: number 16 employee you have to have you representatives that is entitled to paid leave? >> eight hours per month. >> if you hire one more he must be disabled? >> number 16 the next one must be disabled or you pay the fine. john: 51st, 7% of payroll must be handicapped. >> 7% must qualify as disabled. rates of disability are pretty high. john: 101 employees, more rules. spain has reformed the stupid work rules that they no longer have to pay 42 months severance pay now it is just 24 months. that is still two years. >> if they turn out badly you will turn up and know them they show them two years. >> having 350,000 under severance pay but now just 200,000. why hire somebody to
she got the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers you have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self assessment outlying every possible health and safety hazard? >> yes. we're not just talking about heavy machinery but how you deal with specific stress with your age, gender, a doctor, the overwhelming majority of italian workers work with 10 or fewer employees. john: number 16 employee you have to have you reesentatives that is entitled to paid leave? >> eight hours per month. >> if you hire one more he must be disabled? >> number 16 the next one must be disabled or you pay the fine. john: 51st, 7% of payroll must be handicapped. >> 7% must qualify as disabled. rates of disability are pretty high. john: 101 employees, more rules. spain has reformed the stupid work rules that they no longer have to pay 42 months severance pay now it is just 24 months. that is still two years. >> if they turn out badly you will turn up and know them they show them two years. >> having 350
. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's one thing for certain, taxes on top earners are going up. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had thi
decliners well outpacing advancers. the ftse mib in italy down .6%. the ibex down .4%. the dax selling off .5% lower than yesterday. same goes for the ft. if it is, down .8%. 5909. how quickly we've gone from talking about 6,000 to talking about 5,900. the german bund rallying. same goes for the uk. we're seeing a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so for trading in asia, just how japan, china and the rest have been affected by fiscal cliff news, diedra morris is join onning us with plenty more. hi. >> hey, kelly. it was a bit of a rude awaking. a lot of these indexes were on their way to gains and then we had the fiscal cliff setback. we had news that john
. italy, spain, portugal, greece and ireland, hungry are in terrible shape. serious terrible shape. and because some folks don't pay attention to numbers, here's a chance for a statistic to help. students of mine, professors who came to the united states to study the universities where i taught. now professors at the university of acton, major universities increased. today their salaries as we speak are 40 percent less than what they were in may of 2010. try to imagine yourself in a job that you've kept in which the money you get every week is 40% less. police, fire, school teachers, social workers, you name it. .. governments in france and germany have been very frightened since they too are facing an economic crisis and they too are trying to solve it by making demands of their people to pay for something we come in to. they have chosen to use a very dangerous strategy particularly warm germany and the strategy goes like this. we the government are your friends, you the german working-class, because we are not going to allow you to be made to pay for those lazy southern european
through this organization in europe, it's much easier to come to a coordination between italy, france and spain that if we had little representative. so europe with this model of collection societies is making it much easier to implement in other countries. >> and what do you expect this to mean for the music industry as you look ahead as you've cleared this obstacle? >> our aim is to make sure that the digital music market is developing. take the work of people talking to the consumer and what we want is to make our content more available so that they can stimulate more the market and give some interesting value to the consume are. so our aim is to make the digital market growing even faster. >> and what model did you have in mind if any or did you have to create the model here? >> well, you know, we are here to make sure that all digital platform -- we are here to support them. so whatever the models they ca imagine, we're here to find a way to find the connection between our consumer and creators. we're here to facilitate and make sure at the end the music market is growing again.
. at a football game, he is looking with all the other men, and it is italy against switzerland. at one time, the italians win. i find it beautiful and emotional at the same time. he betrayed himself through that reaction, and at the same time, it was beautiful, but at the same time, it is sad that you have to change your color or to hide it. that you have to do something like that to deny even your origin. you have to be proud of your urgent and to show it. >> you are giving me a challenge and a challenge -- giving me a challenge and yourself a challenge. what about cult? that is not something to hide behind. it is so out there, and yet, it can be quite important part of your collection. why? >> i have been very marked by the movement. -- what about punk? >> it is not like a creation, absolute. it is part of living in society. of course, the punk movement was very important. like already taken by the society in some ways. i must say that when i was going to london, i loved that. the inspiration, through the air, to everything. at the same time, i was fascinated. because i was not part of th
of putting on taxes. >>> france, italy, the united kingdom, even greece is raising its tax rates and it's not helping at all. growth rate is very low. thank you. bugging your bus with your own tax dollars. government says it's eefgs dropping for your own safety, folks, but it is just a costly invasion of your privacy? wow. these are really good. you act surprised. aah! aah! practice makes perfect. announcer: you don't have to be perfect to be a perfect parent. there are thousands of teens in foster care who don't need perfection, they need you. >>> nothing private anymore. san francisco the latest city putting eavesdropping devices on public buses. department homeland security dishing out $6 million to the city by the bay so it can listen into the passengers and more towns are planning to do the same thing. and john hates the idea. why? >> its horrifying blast to the iron curtain world of the past where brutal governments snoop on people. we're not subjects of the federal government. they work for us. the idea they become angels so they can look over us is really scary thing. >> it's th
as it was at the beginning of the year, but the eu faces problems in 2013 as well -- a new election in italy could put silvio berlusconi back in power, and france's francois hollande has to tackle urgent issues at home, so there is plenty of work for europ's firefighters next year. >> the past year, we have often brought you images of very angry protests in greece that were mostly against the harsh austerity measures imposed by the government in return for a bailout funds from lenders. >> without this, greece would certainly have gone bankrupt, but it still a long way from clear that the bailout and the reforms they are tied to will get the economy back on the road to recovery. >> meanwhile, the suffering continues for the greek people. the situation is especially dire in rural villages. >> we are on our way to a village on the border with bulgaria. most of the village's 500 inhabitants are muslim -- a minority in the orthodox christian country. the village also claims the dubious distinction of being the poorest village in greece, with an average income of roughly 6000 euros a year. >> everything is being c
instead of putting on taxes. >>> france, italy, the united kingdom, even greece is raising its tax rates and it's not helping at all. growth rate is very low. thank you. bugging your bus with your own tax dollars. government says it's eefgs dropping for your own safety, folks, but it is just a costly invasion of your privacy? >>> nothing private anymore. san francisco the latest city putting eavesdropping devices on public buses. department homeland security dishing out $6 million to the city by the bay so it can listen into the passengers and more towns are planning to do the same thing. and john hates the idea. why? >> its horrifying blast to the iron curtain world of the past where brutal governments snoop on people. we're not subjects of the federal government. they work for us. the idea they become angels so they can look over us is really scary thing. >> it's the worst of the past. big brother era and worst of the future with high technology. what do you think? >> please. come on. a lot of crime happens on buses. i think it's a great idea we have cameras in there. it's not like som
the road, which is rich coming from a european. >>> european trading the lower this morning. italy's prime minister mario monti, yes, the same one that is famous from all the anti-trust things back in the -- was that the '90s? >> the '90s, yeah. >> monti announcing he'll step down before his term ends. the decision comes after the party of sylvia berlusconi withdrew support for monti's government last week. berlusconi has indicated he will run for leadership again. cnbc's carolin roth will join us from italy with the latest in a few minutes. when i was over there, i had to have the -- all the political signs translated because there's a picture of monti sitting under a beach chair drinking a drink and all the text was send monti to the beach. they already didn't like him. >> he had very high disapproval ratings. i remember last summer i had seen that somewhere. >> they want to send him to the beach. the major european averages at this hour, there they, they're all down. not great in france, but germany down about .7% and the ftse down fractionally. other news out of europe, debt tieback fo
roughly speaking in the likes of italy and france and actually grew for germany. then in q4, it seems that there is a greater degree of destocking i think, materializing. i think that is going to lead to some weakness on the industrial production side and it does appear that the austerity is very much perceived by household and by service sector companies. and that explains this relatively soft data. it's a sign that really we are still in a period of multi-year major fiscal entrenchment and at the same time, we have a very cautious perspective towards taking on debt. both by the suppliers and the demanders of that debt. >> julian, very briefly, will we see more qe? will we see any more next year or not? >> well, it will depend, i think, on how things develop. on our baseline forecast, the answer to that would be no because we are looking for recovery coming through really reasonably significantly from the first quarter of next year with .4% quarter on quarter. >> julian, thanks for that. always good to see you. julian kelly joining us from barclays. which country is more corrupt and
won't do particularly well, but germany and italy maybe next year have a potential surprise on the upside. >> how much of a surprise? >> it will not be a fast recovery. the ecb will be forced to do more, but they'll be drald dragged into it. so things will have to get worse before they act. so i don't really think -- >> what more actions? they have a t program waiting to go. what more actions are you talking about? >> the key policy rate for the ecb is likely indeed in the first quarter. they can take dpopt deposit rate negative. by the middle of next year, they'll be doing outright qe. i've been talking about this for ages. they haven't done it so maybe they won't do it. but i'm assuming that the outlook for inflation for the eurozone is -- >> how are they going to get around -- look, i know the bundes bank has a fear of hyper inflation. i just don't -- are they going to get around all the -- because even if they do it on the inflation mandate, are they going to get around the objections about outright money printing? germans would see it as that. >> they would see it as ou
's happening with italian politics. of course, mario monti saying he was going to resign as italy's prime minister. that paves the way for flesh elections to be called in the beginning of next year. yesterday, we saw the negative reaction. sylvia berlusconi wants to make his return on the political scene. today, we saw a bounce back. if you can see see bind me, the bank stocks in italy rerebound, but it's only in the range of .5% to 1% of these names which were down in some cases nearly 10% yesterday. if you take a quick look at european bourses, if that's possible, down near the ftse mib, this is the one selling off somewhere in the range of 3.5% yesterday. today it's adding about .8%. in spain, showing a nice rebound. same attitude listing peripheral debt. we can take a look there. italy and spain seeing prices rise, yields falling to 4.75% and 5.75% respectively. is investor attention returning to spain? here is the thing. italy is the third biggest government debt market in the world. it's the third biggest economy in the eurozone. whatever happens with its political situation could p
to invade norway, sumatra, trieste, italy, sicily, somewhere in france some day. and his generals were pulling their hair out and eisenhower was. wanted to be all over the map, everywhere. and the fiores -- forays to greece were utter disasters. i would love to follow hovering behind him churchill as he goes from meeting to meeting and it is norway, then when he sells his generals on maybe the viability of going to norway or thinking about it, then he says no, no, we will go to sumatra instead. he gave them fits. host: so, you would tell all kinds of stories in here. you covered the dunkirk story. where was he, what year is dunkirk, what was it and where was he in this process? guest: the evacuation? host: yes. guest: that would be the last week of m
is terms of the cost of transportation to get to egypt than it was to get a hundred miles inland in italy. you couldn't bring food from a hundred miles inland to rome, because even with carts, even with oxen, it simply cost too much. so rome was able to tap into the production of other areas because it was able to use ships where the cost of transportation was extremely low. keach: but roman seagoing merchant ships carrying upwards of a thousand tons were too large to navigate the tiber river, so cargos were unloaded onto smaller vessels downriver at the port city of ostia. ostia was once a bustling commercial city, with shops and restaurants... villas and apartment houses for merchants and shippers... theaters, parks and enormous warehouses crammed with every possible commodity. archaeologist amanda claridge. it's clear that the merchants, the many, many thousands of people involved in the supply of the city of rome who did base themselves in ostia -- all the transient ships' captains and the crews and all the people who worked in the port and the supporting industries -- shipbuilding an
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)